Series Circuits All Topics | PPT | web4study

Series Circuits All Topics | PPT



Series Circuits

Topics Covered in this PPT

Why I Is the Same in All Parts of a Series Circuit

Total R Equals the Sum of All Series Resistances

Series IR Voltage Drops

Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law (KVL)

Polarity of IR Voltage Drops

Total Power in a Series Circuit

Series-Aiding and Series-Opposing Voltages

Analyzing Series Circuits with Random Unknowns

Ground Connections in Electrical and Electronic Systems

Troubleshooting: Opens and Shorts in Series Circuits

 

Why I Is the Same in All Parts of a Series Circuit

Characteristics of a Series Circuit

  • The current is the same everywhere in a series circuit.
  • The total resistance is equal to the sum of the individual resistance values.
  • The total voltage is equal to the sum of the IR voltage drops across the individual resistances.
  • The total power is equal to the sum of the power dissipated by each resistance.
  • Current is the movement of electric charge between two points, produced by the applied voltage.
  • The free electrons moving away from one point are continuously replaced by free electrons flowing from an adjacent point in the series circuit.
  • All electrons have the same speed as those leaving the voltage source.
  • Therefore, I is the same in all parts of a series circuit.

Series Circuit

Fig. 4-2: There is only one current in R1, R2, and R3 in series. (a) Electron drift is the same in all parts of a series circuit. (b) Current I is the same at all points in a series circuit.

  • Series Current Formulas
  • Total current is the same as the individual currents in the series string:
  • IT = I1 = I2 = I3 = … = etc.
  • Total current is equal to total voltage divided by total resistance:
  • IT=VT/RT

 

  • When a series circuit is connected to a voltage source, the free electrons must drift through all the series resistances.
  • There is only one path for free electrons to follow.
  • If there are two or more resistances in the same current path, the total resistance across the voltage source is the sum of all the resistances.

 

Total R Equals the Sum of All Series Resistances

  • Series Resistance Formulas
  • The total resistance is the sum of the individual resistances.
  • RT = R1 + R2 + R3 + R4 + R5
  • Series Resistance Formulas
  • Total resistance is equal to total voltage divided by the circuit current:
  • Rt=Vt/It

 

Series IR Voltage Drops

  • By Ohm’s Law, the voltage across a resistance equals I × R.
  • In a series circuit, the IR voltage across each resistance is called an IR drop or voltage drop, because it reduces the potential difference available for the remaining resistance in the circuit.

Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law (KVL)

Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law (KVL)

The IR drops must add to equal the applied voltage (KVL).

VT = V1 + V2 + V3 + V4 + V5

VT = IR1 + IR2 + IR3 + IR4 + IR5

VT = 0.1 × 10 + 0.1 × 15 + 0.1 × 20 + 0.1 × 30 + 0.1 × 25

VT = 1 V + 1.5 V + 2 V + 3 V + 2.5 V = 10 V

 

Polarity of IR Voltage Drops

When current flows through a resistor, a voltage equal to IR is dropped across the resistor. The polarity of this IR voltage drop is:

  • Negative at the end where the electrons enter the resistor.
  • Positive at the end where the electrons leave the resistor.
  • The rule is reversed when considering conventional current: positive charges move into the positive side of the IR voltage.
  • The polarity of the IR drop is the same, regardless of whether we consider electron flow or conventional current.

Total Power in a Series Circuit

  • The power needed to produce current in each series resistor is used up in the form of heat.
  • The total power used in the circuit is equal to the sum of the individual powers dissipated in each part of the circuit.
  • Total power can also be calculated as VT × I

Finding Total Power

PT = P1 + P2 + P3 + P4 + P5

PT = I2R1 + I2R2 + I2R3 + I2R4 + I2R5

PT = 0.1 W + 0.15 W + 0.2 W + 0.3 W + 0.25 W  =  1 W

PT = 0.1 W + 0.15 W + 0.2 W + 0.3 W + 0.25 W  =  1 W

 

Series-Aiding and Series-Opposing Voltages

  • Series-aiding voltages are connected with polarities that allow current in the same direction:
  • The positive terminal of one is connected to the negative terminal of the next.
  • They can be added to the total voltage.
  • Series-opposing voltages are the opposite: They are connected to produce opposing directions of current flow.
  • The positive terminal of one is connected to the positive terminal of another.
  • To obtain the total voltage, subtract the smaller voltage from the larger.
  • Two equal series-opposing voltage sources have a net voltage of zero.

Analyzing Series Circuits with Random Unknowns

  • When trying to analyze a series circuit, keep the following principles in mind:

1.If I is known for one component, use this value in all components.

  • The current is the same in all parts of a series circuit.

2.If I is unknown, it may be calculated in one of two ways:

  • Divide VT by RT
  • Divide an individual IR drop by its R.
  • Remember not to mix a total value for an entire circuit with an individual value for part of the circuit.

3.If all individual voltage drops are known, add them to determine the applied VT.

  • A known voltage drop may be subtracted from VT to find a remaining voltage drop.

 

Ground Connections in Electrical and Electronic Systems

  • In most electrical and electronic systems, one side of the voltage source is connected to ground.
  • The reason for doing this is to reduce the possibility of electric shock.
  • Figure 4-16 shows several schematic ground symbols:

Ground Connections in Electrical and Electronic Systems

  • The ground is assumed to have a potential of 0 V regardless of the schematic symbol shown.
  • These symbols are sometimes used inconsistently with their definitions. However, these symbols always represent a common return path for current in a given circuit.
  • Voltages Measured with Respect to Ground
  • When a circuit has a ground as a common return, measure the voltages with respect to this ground.

 

Troubleshooting: Opens and Shorts in Series Circuits

The Effect of an Open in a Series Circuit

  • An open circuit is a circuit with a break in the current path. When a series circuit is open, the current is zero in all parts of the circuit.
  • The total resistance of an open circuit is infinite ohms.
  • When a series circuit is open, the applied voltage appears across the open points.
  • Applied voltage VT is still present, even with zero current.
  • The voltage source still has its same potential difference across its positive and negative terminals.
  • Example: The 120-V potential difference is always available from the terminals of a wall outlet.
  • If an appliance is connected, current will flow.
  • If you touch the metal terminals when nothing else is connected, you will receive a shock.

The Effect of a Short in a Series Circuit

  • When part of a series circuit is shorted, the current flow increases.
  • When part of a series circuit is shorted, the voltage drops across the non-shorted elements increase.
  • The voltage drop across the shorted component drops to 0 V.
  • When troubleshooting a series circuit containing three or more resistors, remember:
  • The component whose voltage changes in the opposite direction of the other components is the defective component.

 

 

 


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